Skip to main content

Reply to this post | Go Back
View Post [edit]

Poster: cosmico Date: Jan 12, 2013 5:58pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Remakes of PD Films

I've noticed that some low-budget filmmakers have remade or are re-making old PD films, for example ATTACK OF THE GIANT LEECHES, WASP WOMAN, and a few others whose titles I've forgotten. Or producing sequels, as in the case of THE KILLER SHREWS. Sometimes the makers change the title and rewrite the script, sometimes they don't bother.

I don't necessarily see this as a "bad" thing, unless it's purely to poke "fun" at the original film. I can think of a few PD films that were good enough that they deserve being remade intact and without an aura of condescension or snark, because while I think remakes are generally a waste of time and money, perhaps they interest today's film buffs to the originals whose creativity they mine.

Just a thought or two.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: Video-Cellar Date: Jan 13, 2013 1:30pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

A couple of years ago Joseph Nasser emailed me asking for ideas on which public domain sci-fi, mystery, thriller and action movies that would be ripe for remaking. Looks like they have done "Dawn Rider" with Christian Slater in the John Wayne role and "Five Minutes to Live" with John Cusak in the Johnny Cash role. They have a modernisation of "The Stranger" (an ex serial killer is hiding in a small town as a professor at the local college) in pre-production.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: cosmico Date: Jan 14, 2013 3:52pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

Interesting. It seems to be a notion that several filmmakers have pursued. Not a bad idea when you want to make a film and can't find or afford a screenwriter (or are looking for some good new/old film ideas).


This post was modified by cosmico on 2013-01-14 23:52:37

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: skybandit Date: Jan 12, 2013 10:08pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

I've always felt that Hollywood has it back asswards. Why remake GOOD films? Remake a turkey like "Killers from Space" or "Phantom Planet," and there's nowhere to go but up! I've already done a treatment of "Robot Monster." Couldn't cost too much to get THOSE rights, eh?

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: RipJarvis Date: Jan 13, 2013 6:29am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

I've done a stage musical based on Ed Wood's life called "The Terrible Turkey from Outer Space." At the end he dies just as he is getting an Oscar.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: cosmico Date: Jan 14, 2013 12:38am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

Small world. I wrote a script back in the '80s about Ed Wood's glory years and eventual decline and death; it was never produced except for an artist who turned it into a graphic novel (unpublished).

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: RipJarvis Date: Jan 14, 2013 6:39am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

I had a couple of nibbles from producers, but nothing to take to the bank. I later included it as a short story in my collection "Vishnu's Snooze Alarm." You can still get it on Amazon and Barnes and Noble on line. I changed the name to "24 Dreams a Minute"

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: The_Master_Cylinder Date: Jan 14, 2013 9:01pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

There's one copy available on Amazon. Have you ever considered re-printing it as a Kindle book? Pretty simple to do.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: cosmico Date: Jan 14, 2013 12:44am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

In the case of Robot Monster you might have to talk to Wade Williams.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: palos verdes Date: Jan 13, 2013 8:14am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

The other tack that writers have taken is to take a PD movie script like "The 39 Steps" and put it on stage, with 4 actors playing all the parts. I think that's a great use of PD scripts, and brings us a step closer to what theater originally meant, a ritual. What is more ritualistic in our secular culture than going to a theater and reciting the lines of the actors on stage, already known and memorized by us? What is more like religious ritual than this?
Does this ritual side of this practice disappear when we watch alone at home? I think we lose a great deal when we do not share our rituals. We laugh alone at home when the comedy tickles us, but in the company of our fellow worshippers, in a packed theater in the darkness, we roar.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: cosmico Date: Jan 15, 2013 9:52pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Remakes of PD Films

That sounds fascinating and unusual as well. Too many years since I did anything close to theater (except screening films for large groups), but I can see it as a form of ritual. Almost sounds like MST3K tho, the idea of reciting memorized lines or laughing together. I guess I have too much respect for most maker's films, even the cheapest ones, to laugh unless it's intended as comedy. Sometimes though, it's hard to stifle chuckles, though. Robot Monster, for example, until you learn that it was meant as a child's fantasy, in which context the "silliness" is meant as the POV of a young kid of the early '50s. Then the rayguns, bubbles, gorilla suits, space helmets, and stock footage lizards all make perfect sense.


This post was modified by cosmico on 2013-01-16 05:52:51